Joseph Powell

Joseph Powell



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Joseph Powell was born in Bristol in 1870. After leaving school he joined the British Army. He served in the Walsall 80th Staffordshire Regiment and developed a reputation as a talented right-back and in December 1892, Woolwich Arsenal bought him out of the army.

In the 1893-94 season he became club captain. Powell was also first-choice during the 1894-95 and 1895-96 season.

On 23rd November 1896, Powell went to kick a high ball during a game against Kettering Town. His foot caught on the shoulder of an opponent and Powell fell and broke his arm. One of the men who went to his aid fainted at the sight of the protruding bone. Infection set in and, despite amputation above the elbow, Powell died a few days later when just twenty-six years of age.


The Powell Buttes are five rhyolitic buttes in western Crook County in Central Oregon. [1] One of the buttes is considerably larger than the rest. [2] Hat Rock is one of the named summits. [3] [4] In addition to the rhyolite, tuff and diatomite also comprise the buttes. [2] Welded tuff has been found, showing it once comprised the Crooked River caldera. [5]

The buttes are morphologically related to the Ochoco Mountains. Low grade uranium was found in very small amounts along the western side of one of the smaller buttes. [2]

In the summer, the environment around the Powell Buttes is dry and warm during the day and cool at night. In the winter, the weather is cold with snow occurring from October through April. [6]

The Powell Buttes are named for members of the Joseph Powell family who were among the first American pioneers to cross the Cascade Range from the Willamette Valley to range their cattle in Central Oregon. [10]

In 1989, the Bureau of Land Management established a 520-acre (210 ha) Research Natural Area along the south side of the mountain including the southwest and southeast slopes. The area's status was confirmed by a second study in 2005. [6]

A large destination resort by Pahlisch Homes, called the Hidden Canyon, was planned for development on the buttes but never saw completion because of land impact issues related to wildlife, among other reasons. [11]

From 1986 to 2018, Powell Butte was the site of one of two facilities of Oregon State University's Central Oregon Agricultural Research Center. The Powell Butte agricultural research farm acted as a center for potato variety development and hay production. [12] The site encompassed 80 acres (0.32 km 2 ), most of which were dedicated to potato seed development. In 2010, an outbreak of the potato cyst nematode Globodera ellingtonae caused the farm to shut down, with major research activity moving to a different site in the city of Klamath Falls. [13] In June 2018, the land was sold to an industrial hemp producer. [14]


Thomas Powell

Thomas Powell, Gentleman (c1640 - 8 Dec 1714) is said to have been born in Holt, Denbighshire, Wales. [Note: This is a simulated portrait of Thomas. This is not an actual lithograph.]

Thomas is said to have married a Jane Handley. A Thomas Powell married a Jane Handley of Woolstanwood in Nantwich Parish, Cheshire, England on 1 Jan 1679, according to Nantwich Parish records. The marriage license was applied for on 10 Dec 1678, according to the same record. If this is the same Thomas, he may not have joined with the Quakers, at least openly, until after he and Jane were married. That said, the timing of this particular marriage does not match the infromation provided by other researchers.

If the above mentioned marriage is correct, it is likely that Thomas Powell (b. 17 May 1680) and Sarah Powell (b. 28 Feb 1682) of Woolstanwood were the children of Thomas and Jane. The Nantwich Parish records indicate that the father of Thomas and Sarah was a Thomas Powell.

In 1679, Thomas Powell and possibly his brother a Joseph Powell were fined 20 pounds each, along with 20 other Quakers, for not attending their parish churches. At the time, Thomas resided in Rudheath Lordship, Cheshire, England, all according to "Cheshire notes and queries." Rudheath is just 27 miles northeast of Holt, so it is plausible that he was born in Holt. It was this persecution that led Thomas to purchase land from William Penn in order to take his family to America. [Note: Joseph may have been a Joseph Powell of Acton, which is located near Nantwich.]

Thomas arrived in America on 14 Aug 1682 on the ship "Friendship," captained by Robert Crossman out of Liverpool. During this long trans-Atlantic journey, his son Thomas Jr. died on 17 May 1682 and was thus buried at sea, according to "Early Church Records of Delaware County, Pennsylvania" by John Pitts Launey.

In Mar 1681, before journeying to America, 180 acres south of the Robinson land in Upper Providence, Chester Co., PA was surveyed to Thomas, according to the "History of Delaware County" by Henry Ashmead. On 22 Mar 1682, Thomas had purchased two lots of land from William Penn, 250 and 500 acres respectively, according to "Annals of Pennsylvania, from the Discovery of the Delaware" by Samuel Hazard. At that time William Penn was selling land at a bout 40 shillings per hundred acres, so Thomas Powell would have paid 15 pounds sterling for this land. [Note: A skilled craftsman during the late 1600s only made about 40 pounds a year.] In 1683, Philadelphia lots were drawn up and distributed based on how much land a person purchased. Thomas Powell was given back lots given that his land purchases were under 1000 acres lot #5 in the back lots on the Delaware River side and lot #110 on the Schuykill River side of Philadelphia, according to "Digest of the Ordinances of the Corporation of the City of Philadelphia ." Also according to Hazard's book, on 19 Jul 1682, in the drawing of Philadelphia city lots, Thomas received plat #27 on Second St, plat #48 on Broad St, plat #16 on Fourth St, and plat #49 on Back St.

Philadelphia, 1683 (Thomas Powell land highlighted in enlargement.)

Thomas Powell 180 acres in Providence.

While Thomas' status in England is not yet known, in America his status was pobably that of a yeoman, or rather a prosperous farmer who held freehold or copyhold land. Given the wealth of yeoman, their children could enter the ranks of the lesser gentry through marriage to gentry families, by going to university, or through military service. That said his will listed him as a gentleman, while his sons in their wills were listed as yeoman according to "Wills of Chester County, Pennsylvania, 1713-1748" by Jacob Martin, Joseph Martin.

[Side Note: On 5 Feb 1688, Thomas subscribed to the position of not selling or trading alcohol to the indians, according to the above mentioned book by John Pitts Launey.]

On 2 Jul 1690, Thomas donated an acre of land to Peter Taylor and Randall Maylin in the behalf of several others to be used as a "Friends" cemetery, which is now known as the "Sandy Bank" graveyard located in Upper Providence, according to "History of Delaware County, Pennsylvania" by George Smith. In the same year, Thomas donated 2 pounds 10 shillings toward the building of a meeting house in Chester. However, on 2 Nov 1692, the meeting of friends declared that Randall Vernon and Randall Meallen should go and return to Thomas his money that he lent toward building the meeting house and for the land, most likely because of Thomas' departure to the schism of the Society of Keithians or Keithites, Quakers who followed the teachings of George Keith.

George Keith held his meetings at the home of Thomas Powell in Providence. Thomas was baptized into the Keithian division by Thomas Martin in 1697, according to "History of Chester County, Pa with Genealogical & Biographical Sketches" by John Smith Futhey, Gilbert Cope. Over a dispute about when the Sabbath should be, Thomas and his family, along wiht George Keith himself, left the Keithians and joined the Episcopal Church. As of 1703, George Keith was still holding meetings, but now as an Episcopalian, at the home of Thomas Powell, all according to Ashmead's book.

Thomas Powell's Last Will and Testament:

This the fourth day of December in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred & fourteen I Thomas Powell, Senr. of Upper Providence in Chester Co and Province of Pensilvania. Gentleman being very sick and weak in body but of perfect mind and memory thanks be given to God therefore calling unto mind the mortality of my body & knowing that it is appointed for all men once to dye. Do make and ordain this my last will and Testament(That is to say) principally & first of all I give and recommend my soul into the hands of God that gave it and for my body I recommend it to ye earth to be buried in a Christian like & decent maner at the discretion of my Executors nothing doubting but at ye Generall Resurrection I shall receive ye same again by ye mighty power of God and as touching such worldly Estate wherewith it hath pleased God to bless me in this life I give Devise & dispose ye same in ye following maner and form.

IMPRIMIS I give & bequeath unto the Church that is for the use of ye Church at Chester four Lotts of ground lying in James's Street over against the Church, they all joyn togeather. Item. I give & bequeath unto Anna my dearly beloved wife one half of my estate both real & personall during her life. Item. I leave my three sons John, Joseph & Thomas twelve pence a piece and no more. item. I leave to my son John Powell's children there being four sons of them Viz. Joseph Powell, John Powell, Jur. Thomas Powell & Benjamin Powell forty pounds, to each of them ten pounds a piece. Also I give & Bequeath to my son John Powell's two daughters Mary & Margaret Powell five pounds a piece. item. I leave to my son Thomas, after the decease of my wife Anna Powell the other half of my estate both personall & Recall it also my will & Testament. That ye above mentioned Legacies be paid within a twelve month & a day after my Departure in current money of the provinceof Pensylvania. Item. I leave Anna my dearly beloved wife and son John Powell Excecutors of this my last will & Testament and I do here by utterly disallow revoke and disannull all & every other former Testaments wills & Bequethed Ratifying & confirming this and no other to be my last will & Testament. In witness wherof I have hereunto set my hand and seal the Day & year above written.

Signed Sealed published pronounced & Delcared by the said Thomas Powell as his last will and Testament in the presence of us the subscribers the word(Powell's) being interlined before signed and sealed.

John Humphreys Thomas Weston Joseph Elly

In 1714, Reverand Ross of St. Paul's Episcopal Church commended Thomas for his willed donation of lands that would be used for a "minister's house, garden and other conveniences," according to "Country Clergy of Pennsylvania" by Samuel Fitch Hotchkin.

John Powell

John Powell, yeoman (bef 1665 - 15 Jul 1734) was born in Cheshire, England and was the first son of Thomas Powell. John emigrated with his father Thomas on 14 Aug 1682 on the ship "Friendship," captained by Robert Crossman out of Liverpool, England, according to the ship's passenger list. [Note: This is a simulated portrait of John. This is not an actual painting.]

In about 1689, John married his neighbor who emigrated to America with him at the same time on the "Friendship," Elizabeth Taylor, daughter to William Taylor and Margaret Finsham, in Providence, Chester Co., PA. They had the following children:

1. Joseph Powell (c1690 - Aug 1752)
2. John Powell (c1692)
3. Thomas Powell (c1694)
4. Benjamin Powell (c1696)
5. Mary Powell (c1698)
6. Margaret Powell

John and Elizabeth raised their children on their farm in Nether Providence. His holdings included land from his father's original purchase from William Penn, given to John by his father through a deed of gift on May 25, 1703.

As Keithite or Keithian Quakers, followers of George Keith, both John and Elizabeth were baptized at Ridley Creek on 27 Sep 1697. They separated from the group after a dispute on which day should be the Sabbath, the Powell family choosing Sunday. In 1702, they became members of St. Paul's Episcopal Church. John and Elizabeth left the Episcopal church and on June 14, 1715, the Brandywine Baptist Church was constituted at the house of John Powell. Fifteen people were present including John, his wife Elizabeth, his sonJoseph and his wife Joan, and Mary Powell wife of John's brother Joseph.

John's following will was written on on 19 Aug 1727 and it was proved 15 Jul 1734 in Nether Providence:

To son Joseph 5 shillings. To son Thomas 5 shillings. To daughter Mary and Margaret 5 shillings each. To granddaughter Sarah Powell a box iron and haters. To all the rest of my grandchildren a pocket bible. To each of the children of brother Joseph a New Testament. To Susanna daughter of brother Thomas a New Testament. To each of the children of brother in law Samuel Robinett a New Testament. To Owen Thomas, baptist minister in or near New Garden 3 pounds and to the baptist congregation at Birmingham 3 pounds. To wife Elizabeth all lands and remainder to moveables also executrix.

Witnesses: John Beckingham, Francis Pullan, Jer. Colle.


Joseph Powell

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Landon Carter Haynes was born at Buffalo Creek on December 2, 1816. He graduated from Washington College in 1838 and read law with T.A.R. Nelson. He married Eleanor Margaretta Powell on March 26, 1839 and received the Tipton farm as a wedding gift from his father. He represented Washington Co. in the state legislature until 1861 when he was elected to the Confederate Senate. After the Civil War he moved with his family to Memphis, TN where he lived until his death in 1875.

Sarah L. Gifford was borin in 1847 to Lawson and Mary Haynes Gifford. Around 1867, Sarah married Samuel Simerly. In 1882, she acquired the former home of Landon C. Haynes. Samuel and Sarah had two sons, Samuel and Lawson Simerly. On November 10, 1935, Sarah Gifford Simerly died.


Contents

Early life Edit

Powell was born in Mount Morris, New York, in 1834, the son of Joseph and Mary Powell. His father, a poor itinerant preacher, had emigrated to the U.S. from Shrewsbury, England, in 1831. His family moved westward to Jackson, Ohio, then to Walworth County, Wisconsin, before settling in rural Boone County, Illinois. [3] ( pp3–51 )

As a young man he undertook a series of adventures through the Mississippi River valley. In 1855, he spent four months walking across Wisconsin. During 1856, he rowed the Mississippi from St. Anthony, Minnesota, to the sea. In 1857, he rowed down the Ohio River from Pittsburgh to the Mississippi River, traveling north to reach St. Louis. In 1858, he rowed down the Illinois River, then up the Mississippi and the Des Moines River to central Iowa. In 1859, at age 25, he was elected to the Illinois Natural History Society.

Education Edit

Powell studied at Illinois College, Illinois Institute (which would later become Wheaton College), and Oberlin College, over a period of seven years while teaching, but was unable to attain his degree. [4] During his studies Powell acquired a knowledge of Ancient Greek and Latin. Powell had a restless nature and a deep interest in the natural sciences. This desire to learn about natural sciences was against the wishes of his father, yet Powell was still determined to do so. [4] In 1861 when Powell was on a lecture tour he decided that a civil war was inevitable he decided to study military science and engineering to prepare himself for the imminent conflict. [4]

Powell's loyalties remained with the Union and the cause of abolishing slavery. On May 8, 1861, he enlisted at Hennepin, Illinois, as a private in the 20th Illinois Infantry. He was elected sergeant-major of the regiment, and when the 20th Illinois was mustered into the Federal service a month later, Powell was commissioned a second lieutenant. He enlisted in the Union Army as a cartographer, topographer and military engineer. [5]

While stationed at Cape Girardeau, Missouri, he recruited an artillery company that became Battery ‘F’ of the 2nd Illinois Light Artillery, with Powell as captain. On November 28, 1861, Powell took a brief leave to marry Emma Dean. [3] ( p89 ) At the Battle of Shiloh, he lost most of his right arm when struck by a Minié ball while in the process of giving the order to fire. [6] The raw nerve endings in his arm caused him pain for the rest of his life

Despite the loss of an arm, he returned to the Army and was present at the battles of Champion Hill, Big Black River Bridge, and in the siege of Vicksburg. Always the geologist, he took to studying rocks while in the trenches at Vicksburg. [6] He was made a major and commanded an artillery brigade with the 17th Army Corps during the Atlanta campaign. After the fall of Atlanta he was transferred to George H. Thomas’ army and participated in the battle of Nashville. At the end of the war he was made a brevet lieutenant colonel but preferred to use the title of “major”. [6]

After leaving the Army, Powell took the post of professor of geology at Illinois Wesleyan University. He also lectured at Illinois State Normal University for most of his career. Powell helped expand the collections of the Museum of the Illinois State Natural History Society, where he served as curator. He declined a permanent appointment in favor of exploration of the American West. [7] [8]

Expeditions Edit

After 1867, Powell led a series of expeditions into the Rocky Mountains and around the Green and Colorado rivers. One of these expeditions was with his students and his wife, to collect specimens all over Colorado. [6] Powell, William Byers, and five other men were the first white men to climb Longs Peak in 1868. [9]

In 1869, he set out to explore the Colorado River and the Grand Canyon. Gathering ten men, four boats and food for 10 months, he set out from Green River, Wyoming, on May 24. Passing through dangerous rapids, the group passed down the Green River to its confluence with the Colorado River (then also known as the Grand River upriver from the junction), near present-day Moab, Utah, and completed the journey on August 30, 1869. [8]

The members of the first Powell expedition were:

  • John Wesley Powell, trip organizer and leader, major in the Civil War , hunter, trapper, soldier in the Civil War
  • William H. Dunn, hunter, trapper from Colorado
  • Walter H. Powell, captain in the Civil War, John's brother
  • George Y. Bradley, lieutenant in the Civil War, expedition chronicler
  • Oramel G. Howland, printer, editor, hunter
  • Seneca Howland, soldier who was wounded in the Battle of Gettysburg.
  • Frank Goodman, Englishman, adventurer
  • W.R. Hawkins, cook, soldier in Civil War
  • Andrew Hall, Scotsman, the youngest of the expedition

The expedition's route traveled through the Utah canyons of the Colorado River, which Powell described in his published diary as having

. wonderful features—carved walls, royal arches, glens, alcove gulches, mounds and monuments. From which of these features shall we select a name? We decide to call it Glen Canyon.

Frank Goodman quit after the first month, and Dunn and the Howland brothers left at Separation Canyon in the third month. This was just two days before the group reached the mouth of the Virgin River on August 30, after traversing almost 930 mi (1,500 km). The three disappeared some historians have speculated they were killed by the Shivwits Band of Paiutes or by Mormons in the town of Toquerville. [10] [11] [12] [13]

Powell retraced part of the 1869 route in 1871–72 with another expedition that traveled the Colorado River from Green River, Wyoming to Kanab Creek in the Grand Canyon. [14] ( pp111–114 ) This trip resulted in photographs (by John K. Hillers), an accurate map and various papers. At least one Powell scholar, Otis R. Marston, noted the maps produced from the survey were impressionistic rather than precise. [14] In planning this expedition, he employed the services of Jacob Hamblin, a Mormon missionary in southern Utah who had cultivated relationships with Native Americans. Before setting out, Powell used Hamblin as a negotiator to ensure the safety of his expedition from local Indian groups.

After the Colorado Edit

In 1881, Powell was appointed the second director of the U.S. Geological Survey, a post he held until his resignation in 1894, [3] ( pp394, 534 ) being replaced by Charles Walcott. In 1875, Powell published a book based on his explorations of the Colorado, originally titled Report of the Exploration of the Columbia River of the West and Its Tributaries. It was revised and reissued in 1895 as The Exploration of the Colorado River and Its Canyons. In 1889, the intellectual gatherings Powell hosted in his home were formalized as the Cosmos Club. [3] ( pp437–439 ) The club has continued, with members elected to the club for their contributions to scholarship and civic activism.

In the early 1900s the journals of the expedition crew began to be published starting with Dellenbaugh’s A Canyon Voyage in 1908, followed in 1939 by the diary of Almon Harris Thompson, who was married to Powell’s sister, Ellen Powell Thompson. [6] Bishop, Steward, W.C. Powell, and Jones’ diaries were all published in 1947. [6] These diaries made it clear Powell’s writings contained some exaggerations and recounted activities that occurred on the second river trip as if they occurred on the first. They also revealed that Powell, who had only one arm, wore a life jacket, though the other men did not have them. [14] ( pp48, 50–51, 53, 55, 57, 59, 63, 93, 107 )

Powell became the director of the Bureau of Ethnology at the Smithsonian Institution in 1879 and remained so until his death. [10] Under his leadership, the Smithsonian published an influential classification of North American Indian languages. [15] In 1898, Powell was elected a member of the American Antiquarian Society.

As an ethnologist and early anthropologist, Powell was a follower of Lewis Henry Morgan. [3] He classified human societies into ‘savagery’, ‘barbarism’, and ‘civilization’. [16] Powell's criteria were based on consideration of adoption of technology, family and social organization, property relations, and intellectual development. In his view, all societies were to progress toward civilization. Powell is credited with coining the word “acculturation”, first using it in an 1880 report by the U.S. Bureau of American Ethnography. In 1883, Powell defined “acculturation” as psychological changes induced by cross-cultural imitation.

Powell published extensive anthropological studies on the Ute people inhabiting the canyon lands around the Colorado River. His views towards these populations, along with his scientific approach, was built on social Darwinist thought he focused on defining what features distinguished Native Americans as ‘barbaric’, placing them above ‘savagery’ but below ‘civilized’ white Europeans. [17] Indeed, the study of ethnology was a way for scientists to demarcate social categories in order to justify government-sponsored programs that exploited newly appropriated land and its inhabitants. [18] [17] [19] Powell advocated for government funding to be used to ‘civilize’ Native American populations, pushing for the teaching of English, Christianity, and Western methods of farming and . [20] [21]

In his book The Exploration of the Canyons of the Colorado, Powell is motivated to conduct ethnologic studies because "these Indians are more nearly in their primate condition than any others on the continent with whom I am acquainted." [20] As Wallace Stegner posits in Beyond the 100th Meridian, by 1869, many Native American tribes had been pushed to extinction, and those that were known were considered corrupted by intercultural exchange. [10] Even in 1939, Julian Steward, an anthropologist compiling photographs from Powell’s 1873 expedition suggested that: “Fascinated at finding [Native Americans] nearly untouched by civilization, he developed a deep interest in ethnology . Few explorers in the United States have had a comparable opportunity to study and photograph Indians so nearly in their aboriginal state.” [22]

Powell created Illinois State University’s first Museum of Anthropology which at the time was called the finest in all of North America. [23] Powell held a post as lecturer on the History of Culture in the Political Science department at the Columbian University in Washington, D.C. from 1894 to 1899. [24] Powell's contribution to anthropology and scientific racism is not well known in the geosciences, however a recent article revisited Powell's legacy in terms of his social and political impact on Native Americans. [25]

In Cadillac Desert, Powell is portrayed as a champion of land preservation and conservation. [26] Powell’s expeditions led to his belief that the arid West was not suitable for agricultural development, except for about 2% of the lands that were near water sources. His Report on the Lands of the Arid Regions of the United States proposed irrigation systems and state boundaries based on watershed areas to avoid disagreements between states. [27] For the remaining lands, he proposed conservation and low-density, open grazing. [3]

The railroad companies owned 183,000,000 acres (740,000 km 2 ) – vast tracts of lands granted in return for building the railways – and did not agree with Powell’s views on land conservation. They aggressively lobbied Congress to reject Powell’s policy proposals and to encourage farming instead, as they wanted to cash in on their lands. The U.S. Congress went along and developed legislation that encouraged pioneer settlement of the American West based on agricultural use of land. Politicians based their decisions on a theory of Professor Cyrus Thomas who was a protege of Horace Greeley. Thomas suggested that agricultural development of land would change climate and cause higher amounts of precipitations, claiming that ‘rain follows the plow’, a theory which has since been largely discredited.

At an 1883 irrigation conference, Powell would prophetically remark: “Gentlemen, you are piling up a heritage of conflict and litigation over water rights, for there is not sufficient water to supply the land.” [28] Powell’s recommendations for development of the West were largely ignored until after the Dust Bowl of the 1920s and 1930s, resulting in untold suffering associated with pioneer subsistence farms that failed because of insufficient rain and irrigation water.


Reagan and Bush Administrations

Powell earned an MBA at George Washington University, in Washington, D.C., and won a White House fellowship in 1972. He was assigned to the Office of Management and Budget during the Nixon administration and made a lasting impression on Caspar Weinberger and Frank Carlucci. Both men would consult Powell for advice when they served as secretary of defense and national security adviser, respectively, in the Reagan administration.

Colonel Colin Powell served a tour of duty in Korea in 1973 as a battalion commander and after that, he obtained a staff job at the Pentagon. After study at the Army War College, he was promoted to brigadier general and commanded a brigade of the 101st Airborne Division. In the Carter administration, he was an assistant to the deputy secretary of defense and the secretary of energy. Promoted to major general, he again assisted Frank Carlucci at the Department of Defense during the transition from the Carter to the Reagan administration. He then served as senior military aide to Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger, helping to coordinate the invasion of Granada and the bombing of Libya.

In 1987, Powell became national security adviser, a post he held for the duration of the Reagan administration. While there, he coordinated technical and policy advisers during Reagan’s summit meetings with Soviet President Gorbachev and his conferences to topple the pro-Communist Sandinista government in Nicaragua. It was discovered that the administration had arranged for covert and illegal shipments of U.S. weapons to Iran in exchange for the release of hostages. Proceeds from the sale of the weapons would go to support the counter-insurgency movement in Nicaragua, which was aimed at toppling the Sandinistas. Such support had been prohibited by Congress since 1982. Powell was asked to testify before Congress about the incident, but he was not implicated in any wrongdoing.

In 1991, Colin Powell took over the Army Forces Command and was made chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff by President George H. W. Bush. The post is the highest military position in the Department of Defense, and Powell was the first African-American officer to receive that distinction. General Powell became a national figure during Desert Shield and Desert Storm operations in Iraq. As chief military strategist, he developed what became known as the “Powell Doctrine,” an approach to military conflicts that advocates using overwhelming force to maximize success and minimize casualties. He continued as chairman of the Joint Chiefs in the first few months of the Clinton administration. He publicly disagreed with the president on the issue of admitting gays into the military, although he eventually agreed to the 𠇍on’t ask, don’t tell” compromise.


A/Prof Joseph Powell

I am the Head of the Garvan-Weizmann Centre for Cellular Genomics, a Lab Head at Garvan Institute of Medical Research, and a Principal Research Fellow in the Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales. I obtained my PhD from the University of Edinburgh, in 2010. Throughout my PhD I was a member of the scientific advisory board at Aviagen. Following my PhD I moved to Professor Peter Visscher’s (FRS, FAA) group at QIMR, and then the University of Queensland. During this time, I helped form and lead an international consortium to study the genetic control of gene expression, the Consortium for the Architecture of Gene Expression (CAGE). In 2015, I started my own group at the Institute for Molecular Bioscience, where we pioneered the use of single cell sequencing methods to understand the genetic control of disease, and cell development. I am also a founding director of SeqBio, a company developing new diagnostic technology for lung diseases using liquid biopsies and single cell sequencing.

The Computational Genomics Laboratory focuses on demonstrating the genomic mechanisms by which loci contribute to complex human diseases, and working towards early stage diagnosis methods and targeted therapeutics. To do so, we apply existing computational approaches, and develop our own statistical genetics methods for analysis of large-scale next generation sequencing data. Following in silico experiments, we perform functional validation of statistical observations using molecular techniques such as high-throughput genome editing and cell phenotyping. We have a very significant focus on the use of single cell sequence data and technology, due to the phenomenal resolution it offers in being able to identify differences in the genomics processes between individual cells. The laboratory drives projects in a number of areas of medical genomics research, but we also believe strongly in the value of collaboration between groups with differing expertise.

I am the Head of the Garvan-Weizmann Centre for Cellular Genomics, a Lab Head at Garvan Institute of Medical Research, and a Principal Research Fellow in the Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales. I obtained my PhD from the University of Edinburgh, in 2010. Throughout my PhD I was a member of the scientific advisory board at Aviagen. Following my PhD I moved to Professor Peter Visscher’s (FRS, FAA) group at QIMR, and then the University of Queensland. During this time, I helped form and lead an international consortium to study the genetic control of gene expression, the Consortium for the Architecture of Gene Expression (CAGE). In 2015, I started my own group at the Institute for Molecular Bioscience, where we pioneered the use of single cell sequencing methods to understand the genetic control of disease, and cell development. I am also a founding director of SeqBio, a company developing new diagnostic technology for lung diseases using liquid biopsies and single cell sequencing.

The Computational Genomics Laboratory focuses on demonstrating the genomic mechanisms by which loci contribute to complex human diseases, and working towards early stage diagnosis methods and targeted therapeutics. To do so, we apply existing computational approaches, and develop our own statistical genetics methods for analysis of large-scale next generation sequencing data. Following in silico experiments, we perform functional validation of statistical observations using molecular techniques such as high-throughput genome editing and cell phenotyping. We have a very significant focus on the use of single cell sequence data and technology, due to the phenomenal resolution it offers in being able to identify differences in the genomics processes between individual cells. The laboratory drives projects in a number of areas of medical genomics research, but we also believe strongly in the value of collaboration between groups with differing expertise.


POWELL Genealogy

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You've only scratched the surface of Powell family history.

Between 1940 and 2004, in the United States, Powell life expectancy was at its lowest point in 1941, and highest in 2000. The average life expectancy for Powell in 1940 was 45, and 72 in 2004.

An unusually short lifespan might indicate that your Powell ancestors lived in harsh conditions. A short lifespan might also indicate health problems that were once prevalent in your family. The SSDI is a searchable database of more than 70 million names. You can find birthdates, death dates, addresses and more.


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