Serket

Serket


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Serket (also known as Serqet, Selkis, and Selket) is an Egyptian goddess of protection associated with the scorpion. She was worshipped widely in Lower Egypt as a great Mother Goddess in the Predynastic Period (c. 6000- c. 3150 BCE) and so is among the older deities of Egypt.

She is associated with healing, magic, and protection, and her name means "She Who Causes the Throat to Breathe". Her symbols are the scorpion, the Ankh, and the Was Sceptre, all of which convey her benevolent aspects. In the Predynastic Period, she was the protector of the Kings as evidenced by archaeological finds linking her by the name Serqet to the Scorpion Kings, defeated at some point around the reign of Narmer (r. c. 3150 BCE). During that period she was already closely associated with protection and her worship had grown from the Delta Region of Lower Egypt to the cities of Upper Egypt.

She is the goddess of venomous creatures, most notably the scorpion, and is depicted as a beautiful woman, arms outstretched in a gesture of protection, with a scorpion on her head. The scorpion is purposefully shown without a stinger or claws to represent Serket's role as protector against venomous stings. Serket was eventually absorbed into the Cult of Horus where she became closely associated with death and the souls of the deceased. She was then known as "Lady of the Beautiful Tent" which referred to the tent of the embalmers. She is best known for her golden statue and the alabaster canopic jar from the Tomb of Tutankhamun.

Early Role in Religion

Her name, "She Who Causes the Throat to Breathe" comes directly from her association with the scorpion.

There are no mythological tales extant of Serket's origin as there are for most of the other Egyptian gods. She is referenced as being present at the creation of the world but no mention is made of her role. She was seen as a mother goddess in the prehistoric period of Egypt and was already associated with the scorpion which "was a symbol of motherhood in many areas of the Near East" (Wilkinson, 234). She is depicted as nursing the kings of Egypt in the Pyramid Texts, which date to the Old Kingdom (2613-2181 BCE), and one of the protective spells from those texts - known as PT 1375 - reads, "My mother is Isis, my nurse is Nephthys...Neith is behind me, and Serket is before me" (Wilkingson, 233). These four goddesses would later be represented famously in Tutankhamun's tomb on the canopic chest and as gold statues protecting the gilded shrine.

There is no evidence of temples to Serket in any region of Egypt suggesting to some scholars that she either never had any or, more likely, that she was absorbed into the figures of other deities such as Hathor or Neith, who are equally ancient. Neith was the patron goddess of the Delta city of Zau (later known as Sais). Like Hathor, Neith was originally a fierce goddess associated with destruction who later came to be related to weaving and then to wisdom (just as Hathor was originally a blood-thirsty destroyer who became a benevolent protectress). It is possible that Serket followed this same pattern first arising as a mother goddess with a slightly swollen womb and then coming to be associated with scorpions and venom because scorpion bites were so often fatal to Egyptian children. Scholar Geraldine Pinch writes:

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Scorpion stings were a common hazard in Ancient Egypt. The female scorpion is larger than the male and has a greater supply of poison. Representations of Selket always show the tail raised in the stinging position. Scorpion stings cause a burning pain and shortness of breath and can be fatal to young children and the elderly. (189)

Her name, "She Who Causes the Throat to Breathe" comes directly from her association with the scorpion. Amulets were carried with her name on them to protect people from scorpion bites or to help them breathe if they were bitten.

SeRket & the Osiris Myth

The Osiris Myth was the most popular story in ancient Egypt, gaining adherents steadily until, by the New Kingdom (1570-1069 BCE), it significantly informed the values of Egyptian culture. The Osiris Myth tells the story of the god Osiris and his sister-wife Isis who reign over the early paradise of the world. Their brother Set becomes jealous of Osiris and traps him in an ornate casket, killing him, and then hurls the box into the Nile.

Isis retrieves her husband's body and brings him back to Egypt, hiding him in the swamps of the Delta region. She asks her sister Nephthys to stand guard while she goes to gather herbs to return him to life but, while she is gone, Set finds Nephthys and tricks her into revealing where Osiris' body is hidden. He hacks the body to pieces and scatters them across Egypt and into the Nile, and when Isis returns, she only finds the weeping Nephthys who tells her what has happened.

Isis and Nephthys seek out and find all the body parts, and Isis is able to revive her husband. His penis has been eaten by a fish, however, and so he is incomplete and cannot remain as lord on the earth. Prior to his descent to the underworld, Isis turns herself into a falcon and flies around his body, gathering his seed into her own, and becomes pregnant with a son, Horus. Osiris then leaves to assume his new role as Judge of the Dead and Isis is left alone to hide herself and her newborn son from Set.

Serket is sometimes included in the story at this point in her role as protector of the innocent. Isis has a difficult labor and gives birth to Horus in the swamps of the Delta. Serket presides over the birth keeping venomous scorpions and snakes away from the new mother and child. This part of the story would later be cited in Serket's role as protector of women in childbirth and of mothers and children. After Horus' birth, Isis had to continue to hide in the marshes from Set and only went out at night for food. At these times, Serket guarded the baby and sent her scorpions with Isis as her bodyguard.

SeRket & the Seven Scorpions

One of the most popular stories concerning Isis is known as Isis and the Seven Scorpions. It relates how, when Horus was an infant and Isis was hiding him in the swamp lands, Serket had seven scorpions keep her company. When Isis went out to beg for food in the nearby towns, three of them - Petet, Tjetet, and Matet - would go before her to make sure the way was safe and Set was not waiting in ambush, two were on either side of her - Mesetet and Mesetetef - and two brought up the rear - Tefen and Befen, who were the most fierce - in case Set chose to attack from behind.

Whenever she left the swamp, Isis would conceal her glory so she looked like a poor, older woman asking for alms. One night, as she and her bodyguard entered the town, a very rich noblewoman looked down on them from her window and quickly slammed her door and locked it. Serket, though watching over Horus in the swamp, could see all that her scorpions saw, and she was angered at this affront to Isis. She decided the woman would pay for the insult and sent a message to Tefen that he should take care of the situation. The other six scorpions all surrendered their poison to Tefen who drew it up into his stinger and waited for the right moment. In the meantime, a poor peasant woman had seen the noblewoman refuse hospitality and, even though she had little, offered Isis and her scorpions a place under her roof for the night and a simple meal.

While Isis was eating with the young woman, Tefen snuck out of the house and crept beneath the door of the home of the noblewoman, where he stung her young son. The boy fell down in a stupor, and the noblewoman grabbed him up and tried to revive him but could not. She ran into the streets, crying for help, and Isis heard her. Even though the woman had refused her food and a place for the night, Isis forgave her. She did not want the boy to pay for his mother's insult. Isis took the child in her arms and called each of the scorpions by their secret name, thereby dominating them and neutralizing their power, and recited spells of great magic. The poison evaporated, leaving the child's body, and he revived. The noblewoman was so grateful and so ashamed of her earlier behavior, she offered all her wealth to Isis and the peasant woman. Serket, back in the swamp with Horus, regretted having sent the scorpion to attack the innocent boy and vowed to protect all children in the future.

Transformation of Serket

In the same way that the Osiris Myth changed the god Set from a protector hero-god into a villain, it changed Serket's role. Although she continued to be seen as a protectress, her earlier attributes as mother goddess were assumed by Isis while Serket became associated with death and the afterlife. In the story of the seven scorpions, Serket is often omitted entirely, and the focus of the story is on the forgiveness of Isis and the proper way people should treat each other. After the Osiris Myth had taken precedence in Egypt, Serket's role was marginalized on the earthly plane but amplified in the afterlife.

Serket became known as one of the guardian gods who stand watch over souls in the afterlife. Specifically, as Geraldine Pinch notes, she "is one of the deities who guards a bend in the river on the watery route to paradise" (189). She was invoked at funerals for her magical abilities as it was thought she could help the dead to breathe again as they were reborn from their bodies in the afterlife.

In the same way that she rewarded the justified dead with breath, she punished those who were unworthy with breathlessness. The Egyptian afterlife is depicted in a number of different ways with the most popular involving Osiris as Judge of the Dead in the Hall of Truth. If the heart of the deceased weighed more than the feather of ma'at in the scales, it was dropped on the floor and devoured by the monster Ammut; then the soul would cease to exist. In another version, however, the souls of the unjustified are punished for their misdeeds by the Forty-Two Judges who preside with Osiris and Thoth over the Hall of Truth. These souls could be turned over to deities like Serket who would unleash their wrath and torment those who had abused the gift of life.

Similarly, those on earth who preyed on the innocent or engaged in wickedness might be visited by Serket and her scorpions, who might only scare them with a mild bite, bringing shortness of breath and pain, or a stronger dose of venom leading to death. In her role as a goddess of death and the afterlife, she was also responsible for guarding the internal organs of the dead king as it was thought he would need them again once he was reborn after death. She was the protector-goddess of one of the Four Sons of Horus, Qebhesenuef, who guarded the intestines in the canopic jar. Serket was the goddess of poisons and the Egyptians associated the intestines with poison, thus she was given charge over the safety and well-being of Qebhesenuef.

Worship & Clergy

The most significant way in which the Osiris Myth transformed Serket was to attribute her earlier manifestations of power to Isis. She remained a very popular goddess, however, and should not be considered a "lesser goddess" as so many writers on Egyptian mythology refer to her. Although she did not have official temples in her honor, her priests and priestesses were highly sought after and valued greatly for one simple reason: they were doctors.

The clergy of the Cult of Serket were all physicians known as Followers of Serket. Men and women could practice medicine and perform the Rites of Serket. According to historian Margaret Bunson, the practice of medicine was "the science conducted by the priests of the Per-Ankh, the House of Life. The Egyptians termed it the "necessary art" (158)". The House of Life was not a physical location, though it could be, but was a concept of healing. The priests and priestesses of Serket carried the House of Life within them in their knowledge of how to heal. Bunson writes:

Diagnostic procedures for injuries and diseases were common and extensive in Egyptian medical practice. The physicians consulted texts and made their own observations. Each physician listed the symptoms evident in a patient and then decided whether he had the skill to treat the condition. If a priest determined that a cure was possible, he reconsidered the remedies or therapeutic regimens available and proceeeded accordingly. This required, naturally, a remarkable awareness of the functions of the human body. The physicians understood that the pulse was the "speaker of the heart" and they interpreted the condition now known as angina. They were also aware of the relationship between the nervous system and voluntary movements. (158)

Not every physician in Egypt was a Follower of Serket but a good many were. Serket, as goddess of healing and protector against poison and venomous stings, was naturally the patron of doctors, even those who were not directly involved in her cult. Spells invoking Serket for healing were widely used throughout Egypt. The scholar John F. Nunn notes this, writing:

The recto of the Chester Beatty papyrus VII, written in the reign of Ramesses II, contains a number of magical spells for protection against scorpions. Most invoke various wives of Horus whom Gardiner [the Egyptologist, in 1935] suggested might be merely appelations of Serqet who is actually named in the eighth spell:

"Someone approaches me."

"It is not I who approach you, it is Wepet-sepu, wife of Horus, who approaches you."

"You poisons, come forth to me. I am Serqet." (101)

In this spell, the physician would recite the lines as though the patient were having a dialogue with the goddess or goddesses. When 'Serket' said her final line, the poisons were supposed to leave the body of the sick person. Although she is not mentioned by name in every papyrus or inscription, her powers of healing would have been invoked no matter which aspect she was named as or what other goddesses were called upon. In her role as patron of physicians and healing goddess, she helped the people of Egypt from their birth, through their lives, and even into the afterlife.


Serket

As of 3061 the Sovetskii Soyuz-class heavy cruiser Serket was a WarShip within the Clan Goliath Scorpion touman and was serving in the five-ship naval star known as the Wild Hunt Battlegroup as a military escort to Gamma Galaxy. Ώ]

In June 3073 the Serket was one of five vessels amalgamated hastily into a new star - the Alpha Naval Reserve Star - and deployed to the Foster system in an attempt to reassert the Goliath Scorpion presence in the system following the disastrous loss of Gamma Galaxy and Loremaster Kyrie Ben-Shimon in the system a few months before hand. Deploying alongside the Nightlord-class battleship CGS Atropos, the Aegis-class heavy cruiser CGS Corona Borealis, the Congress-class frigate CGS Bernlad and the Lola III-class destroyer CGS Auriga, the various ships transported both the remains of Gamma Galaxy and the entire of Beta Galaxy, and discovered when they entered the system that there was no trace of any forces on the world other than those from Clan Steel Viper. ΐ]

The resulting Trial of Possession for two Steel Viper enclaves on the surface began cordially, but was disrupted by the actions of a Goliath Scorpion warrior who had unwisely used necrosia to excess during the duel, resulting in the battles quickly becoming a free-for-all with the Goliath Scorpions ultimately seizing control of the two enclaves after deploying elements of the Alpha Naval Reserve Star to strike key targets from orbit. ΐ]

Following the battles on Foster, the Scorpions merged the remains of Beta and Gamma Galaxies together and moved to Glory, arriving in-system in September 3073. Glory was home to Kindraa Mattila-Carrol, one of the many Kindraa within Clan Fire Mandrill and allies of the Goliath Scorpions. When the Scorpions arrived they found that the shattered remains of the Kindraa were trying to hold on to their enclave at Portage in the face of repeated strikes from Steel Viper forces. Under the command of saKhan Kelton Myers the Scorpions moved to assist their allies, only to be intercepted by two Steel Viper WarShips, the Potemkin-class cruiser CSV Ophidian and the Aegis-class heavy cruiser CSV Silver Snake. The Steel Vipers declared the Scorpions to be dezgra - a consequence of the earlier battle on Foster - and immediately attacked, with the Ophidian inflicting heavy damage on the Auriga at range. Α]

Both fleets promptly launched AeroSpace Fighters and DropShips and a brutal fight ensued as the Steel Vipers attempted to disrupt the Scorpion forces trying to land on Glory. The Scorpions destroyed the Ophidian and heavily damaged the Silver Snake, but lost the Auriga, Corona Borealis and Serket before the Silver Snake and the remaining Viper fighters were driven back. Α]


Serket

In Egyptian mythology, Serket (also spelt Selchis, Selket, Selkis, Selkhit, Selkit, Selqet, Serkhet, Serket-hetyt, Serqet and Serquet) is the goddess of healing stings and bites who originally was the deification of the scorpion. ΐ]

Scorpion stings lead to paralysis and Serket's name describes this, as it means (she who) tightens the throat, however, Serket's name also can be read as meaning (she who) causes the throat to breathe, and so, as well as being seen as stinging the unrighteous, Serket was seen as one who could cure scorpion stings and the effects of other poisons such as snake bites.

In Ancient Egyptian art, Serket was shown as a scorpion (a symbol found on the earliest artifacts of the culture, such as the protodynastic period), or as a woman with a scorpion on her head. Although Serket does not appear to have had temples, she had a sizable number of priests in many communities.

The most dangerous species of scorpion resides in north Africa, and its sting may kill, so Serket was considered a highly important goddess, and was sometimes considered by pharaohs to be their patron. Her close association with the early kings implies that she was their protector, two being referred to as the scorpion kings.

As the protector against poisons and snake bites, Serket often was said to protect the deities from Apep, the great snake-demon of evil, sometimes being depicted as the guard when Apep was captured.

As many of the venomous creatures of Egypt could prove fatal, Serket also was considered a protector of the dead, particularly being associated with poisons and fluids causing stiffening. She was thus said to be the protector of the tents of embalmers, and of the canopic jar associated with poison—the jar of the intestine—which was deified later as Qebehsenuf, one of the Four sons of Horus.

As the guard of one of the canopic jars and a protector, Serket gained a strong association with Aset (Isis), Nebet Het (Nephthys), and Neith who also performed similar functions. Eventually, later in Egyptian history that spanned thousands of years and whose pantheon evolved toward a merger of many deities, Serket began to be identified as Isis, sharing imagery and parentage, until finally, Serket became said to be merely an aspect of Isis, whose cult had become very dominant.


Serket

Serqet (Serket, Selqet, Selket, Selkit, Selkis) was the ancient Egyptian scorpion goddess of magic. As with other dangerous goddesses, she was both a protective goddess, and one who punished the wrong doers with her burning wrath. She could punish those with the poison of a scorpion or snake, causing breathlessness and death, or she could protect against the same venom. Yet just as she could kill, she was thought to give breath to the justified dead, helping them be reborn in the afterlife.

Serqet was often shown as a woman with a scorpion on her head, and occasionally as a scorpion with the head of a woman, though this was rare. She was sometimes shown wearing the headdress of Hathor - a solar disk with cow horns - but this was after Isis started to be shown wearing it. (Serqet was closely connected with Isis and her twin sister Nephthys.) By the XXI Dynasty, she was sometimes shown with the head of a lioness, with a protective crocodile at the back of her neck.

As a protective goddess, she was called on by the people to protect and heal them from snake bites and scorpion stings. She was thought to be the one who helped Isis protect Horus from scorpions, either by providing the goddess with seven scorpions to protect her, or by calling to Isis for the royal barque of Ra to stop, forcing the other gods to help bring Horus back to life. She also joined Ra's solar journeys through the underworld each night, and helped to protect the barque from the attack of the snake-demon Apep. It was believed that she had power over all snakes, reptiles and poisonous animals. She was thought to especially protect children and pregnant women from these creatures.

In the underworld, she helped in the process of rebirth of the newly deceased, and oriented them as they came to her, giving them the breath of life. She was given the title "Mistress of the Beautiful House", associating her with the Divine Booth where mummification took place. She was the protector of the canopic jar that held the intestines, along with Qebehsenuef - a falcon headed Son of Horus. She was associated with the western cardinal point.

Originally she was worshiped in the Delta, but her cult spread throughout the land of Egypt, with cult centers at Djeba and Per-Serqet (Pselkis, el Dakka). The priests of Serqet were doctors and magicians - in ancient Egypt, medicine was a mixture of folklore, magic and science - who dedicated themselves to healing venomous bites from poisonous creatures. The goddess herself was invoked by the people to both prevent and heal poisonous animal bites. Although she had a priesthood, there have been no temples to this goddess found as yet.

She was believed to be either the mother or daughter of the sun god Ra, and thus her wrath was thought to be like the burning, noonday sun. It was probably because of her very close connection with Isis and her twin sister Nephthys that in Djeba (Utes-Hor, Behde, Edfu), she was believed to be the wife of Horus and the mother of Harakhety (Horus of the Horizon). The Pyramid Texts claim that she was the mother of Nehebkau, a snake god who protected the pharaoh from snakebites. She was also identified with Seshat, the goddess of writing. With Nit, she was a watcher of the sky who, in one story, was thought to stop Amen and his wife from being disturbed while they were together, making her a goddess of marriages.

Egypt was a land of snakes and scorpions, so it is only natural that the worship of this goddess spread through Egypt. The people worshiped her for her protection against these dangerous creatures, and revered her for her power and protective qualities. She guarded all of the people, including the pharaoh, mothers and children. Her followers were priestly doctors, healing the people affected by venom. She extended her protection from life into the land of the dead, not only helping to revive the dead, but to introduce them with the afterlife. She even protected the other gods from the serpent-demon, Apep. Although having no temples, she was worshiped throughout the land of Egypt.


Serket

Scorpion stings lead to paralysis and Serket's name describes this, as it means (she who) tightens the throat, however, Serket's name also can be read as meaning (she who) causes the throat to breathe, and so, as well as being seen as stinging the unrighteous, Serket was seen as one who could cure scorpion stings and the effects of other poisons such as snake bites.

In Ancient Egyptian art, Serket was shown as a scorpion (a symbol found on the earliest artifacts of the culture, such as the protodynastic period), or as a woman with a scorpion on her head. Although Serket does not appear to have had temples, she had a sizable number of priests in many communities.

The most dangerous species of scorpion resides in North Africa, and its sting may kill, so Serket was considered a highly important goddess, and was sometimes considered by pharaohs to be their patron. Her close association with the early kings implies that she was their protector, two being referred to as the scorpion kings.

As the protector against poisons and snake bites, Serket often was said to protect the deities from Apep, the great snake-demon of evil, sometimes being depicted as the guard when Apep was captured.

As many of the venomous creatures of Egypt could prove fatal, Serket also was considered a protector of the dead, particularly being associated with poisons and fluids causing stiffening. She was thus said to be the protector of the tents of embalmers, and of the canopic jar associated with poison—the jar of the intestine—which was deified later as Qebehsenuf, one of the Four sons of Horus.

As the guard of one of the canopic jars and a protector, Serket gained a strong association with Aset (Isis), Nebet Het (Nephthys), and Neith who also performed similar functions. Eventually, later in Egyptian history that spanned thousands of years and whose pantheon evolved toward a merger of many deities, Serket began to be identified with Isis, sharing imagery and parentage, until finally, Serket became said to be merely an aspect of Isis, whose cult had become very dominant.


Relationships [ edit | edit source ]

Aranea says she was not particularly popular among her group of players, referring to Meenah as the only one she would have called a true friend.

Meenah Peixes [ edit | edit source ]

Despite their drastically differing personalities, Meenah and Aranea were best friends throughout the time of their session and afterwards. This is because they both were not particularly popular members of their team. Their friendship ended when Aranea revived herself in an attempt to prevent the kids' session from creating a universe in which L o rd English can reside: shortly after reviving herself, she talked to Meenah who disapproved of her plan.

Porrim Maryam [ edit | edit source ]

In the first part of Openbound, Aranea confesses to Meenah that she and Porrim have shared a redrom relationship. She waves it off as a “ red fling ” , and the subject is visibly upsetting to her, and states that it lasted about half a sweep.

Terezi Pyrope [ edit | edit source ]

Prior to the events of GAME OVER, Terezi and Aranea share a complicated relationship, not totally unlike Terezi's relationship with Vriska. When the two first meet, Terezi says she thinks she and her would have been good friends, being drawn to her similarities with Vriska, and her genial nature. As a sign of good will, Aranea offers to heal Terezi's eyesight with her Sylph of Light abilities, however Terezi declines the offer, seeing her blindness as an important part of her identity and her experiences.

They remain on good terms up until Terezi, lost in a spiral of self-hatred due to her Faygo abuse, her decaying relationships with Dave and Karkat and abusive relationship with Gamzee, decides to take Aranea's offer to heal her sight. This, however only make's Terezi's spiralling even worse, having lost something she saw as important to her self-image, and her dealing with a sensory overload with the return of her eyesight. Their relationship takes a turn towards the antagonistic when Terezi realizes that Aranea's plans to take over the B2 session and, seeing the damage she's causing, attempts to kill the elder Serket. Terezi fails however, and is mortally wounded in her attempt. Terezi later becomes instrumental in repairing the ruined session through aiding and directing John's retcon shenanigans.

Given Aranea's plans to take over the B2 session and her ability to control Gamzee, it is possible that Aranea intentionally used Gamzee as a way to pacify an insecure Terezi, as her Seer of Mind abilities may have stood in the way in Aranea's hostile takeover. However this is not confirmed, so it remains mere speculation

Vriska Serket [ edit | edit source ]

Vriska initially had a very positive relationship towards her dancestor, largely due to their shared admiration for Aranea's post-scratch counterpart, Mindfang. The two shared a very sisterly bond and started being influenced by the other's behavior, with Vriska taking a greater interest in storytelling and Aranea becoming more daring and confident. However, their relationship was far from perfect, as Aranea grew frustrated with the teasing she received from Vriska and Meenah, and was thoroughly fed up with being long dead and irrelevant. Once Aranea learned of the Ring of Life, and its mysterious ability to restore life to the dead, she begun hatching a plan to take over the B2 session, use her advanced powers as a Sylph of Light (with help from Jake English's Page of Hope abilities) to turn the altered session into the Alpha session, and prevent Caliborn from ever existing. This plan failed spectacularly and Aranea died to never be seen again. Vriska and Meenah were left despondent after Aranea's betrayal and eventually lose interest in their plans to kill L o rd English , largely due to the loss of their most powerful psychic.

Following the retcon, it appears that Vriska never met her dancestor, or at the very least, never formed any significant bond with her.


In Egyptian mythology, Serket (also spelled Selket, Selchis, Selkis, and Serqet) is the goddess of healing poisonous stings and bites who originally was the deification of the scorpion.

Scorpion stings lead to paralysis and Serket's name describes this, as it means (she who) tightens the throat, however, Serket's name also can be read as meaning (she who) causes the throat to breathe, and so, as well as being seen as stinging the unrighteous, Serket was seen as one who could cure scorpion stings and the effects of other poisons such as snake bites.

In Ancient Egyptian art, Serket was shown as a scorpion (a symbol found on the earliest artifacts of the culture, such as the protodynastic period), or as a woman with a scorpion on her head. Although Serket does not appear to have had temples, she had a sizable number of priests in many communities.

The most dangerous species of scorpion resides in North Africa, and its sting may kill, so Serket was considered a highly important goddess, and was sometimes considered by pharaohs to be their patron. Her close association with the early kings implies that she was their protector, two being referred to as the scorpion kings. As the protector against poisons and snake bites, Serket often was said to protect the deities from Apep, the great snake-demon of evil, sometimes being depicted as the guard when Apep was captured.

As many of the venomous creatures of Egypt could prove fatal, Serket also was considered a protector of the dead, particularly being associated with poisons and fluids causing stiffening. She was thus said to be the protector of the tents of embalmers, and of the canopic jar associated with poison—the jar of the intestine—which was deified later as Qebehsenuf, one of the Four sons of Horus.

As the guard of one of the canopic jars and a protector, Serket gained a strong association with Aset (Isis), Nebet Het (Nephthys), and Neith who also performed similar functions. Eventually, later in Egyptian history that spanned thousands of years and whose pantheon evolved toward a merger of many deities, Serket began to be identified with Isis, sharing imagery and parentage, until finally, Serket became said to be merely an aspect of Isis, whose cult had become very dominant.


Mục lục

Trong một số thần thoại, bà được nhận danh hiệu "Con mắt của thần Ra", vì vậy bà có thể là con gái của Ra. Theo văn tự cổ, Serket là mẹ của Nehebkau (mặc dù đôi khi được coi là con của Renenutet), vị thần rắn bảo vệ pharaoh khỏi rắn cắn, cũng là vị thần canh giữ cõi âm. Ở Edfu, bà được cho là vợ của Horus và là mẹ của Ra-Horakhty (kết hợp của Ra và Horus). Bà là người bảo vệ của Qebehsenuef (con trai của Horus) - vị thần bảo vệ ruột của người chết. [2]

Theo thần thoại, bà là người đã xua đuổi những loài rắn độc và bò cạp để bảo vệ 2 mẹ con nữ thần Isis khi họ đang lẩn trốn sự truy lùng của thần Set khi ở đầm lầy. Isis chỉ dám ra khỏi đầm lầy vào ban đêm để đi xin ăn nên Serqet đã trông chừng Horus và cho 7 con bò cạp của bà đi theo bảo vệ Isis [1] . Bảy con bò cạp đó là: Petet, Tjetet, Matet, Mesetet, Mesetetef, Tefen và Befen, trong đó Tefen và Befen là 2 con hung dữ nhất.

Trong một lần xin ăn, Isis bị một người phụ nữ giàu có từ chối. Serket biết được điều này, thông qua những con bò cạp của bà, tức giận vì sự xúc phạm đối với Isis, đã ra lệnh cho Tefen trừng phạt người phụ nữ kia. Nhân lúc Isis đang dùng bữa tại nhà một người phụ nữ nghèo khó nhưng tốt bụng, Tefen lẻn ra ngoài và cắn đứa con trai của người phụ nữ giàu kia [2] .

Nghe tiếng kêu thất thanh của người mẹ, Isis đã gọi tên bí mật của 7 con bò cạp, làm chúng yếu đi và bà đã đọc thần chú hồi sinh cho đứa bé. Người phụ nữ giàu có xấu hổ trước hành động của mình nên đã tặng số của cải cho Isis và người phụ nữ nghèo khó kia [2] . Chính vì điều này nên bà được coi là nữ thần bảo vệ trẻ em và những người phụ nữ mang thai khỏi những loài vật có nọc.

Serket là một trong những vị thần có mặt trên chiếc thuyền Mặt trời của thần Ra. Bà có nhiệm vụ quan sát những nguy hiểm trên đường đi và cùng các thần bảo vệ con thuyền trước sự tấn công của con rắn Apep [1] .

Serket được xem là một nữ thần có tầm ảnh hưởng lớn, nên được các pharaoh coi là người bảo vệ của họ, đặc biệt là Scorpion I và Scorpion II, người đã đặt tên theo bà. Theo những dòng văn tự trong ngôi mộ của hoàng hậu Nefertari (vợ của Ramsesses II), nữ thần Serket đã chào đón bà khi bước vào thế giới bên kia [1] . Bà là một trong bốn bức tượng mạ vàng của bốn vị nữ thần bảo vệ pharaoh Tutankhamun khi ngài đi về thế giới bên kia (3 vị kia là Isis, Nephthyps và Neith) [1] [2] .


Serket.

Publication date 1987 Usage http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 Topics Arachnida, Arachnida Publisher Cairo, Egypt : [Hisham K. El-Hennawy] Collection americanmuseumnaturalhistory biodiversity americana Digitizing sponsor BHL-SIL-FEDLINK Contributor American Museum of Natural History Library Language English Volume v.1-2 (1987-1992)

Print version ceased with v. 12 in 2011

Addeddate 2015-05-26 20:20:07.576708 Camera Canon EOS 5D Mark II External-identifier urn:oclc:record:1084830213 Foldoutcount 0 Identifier serket1219elhe Identifier-ark ark:/13960/t62553q0b Invoice 29 Lccn sn 88019040 Ocr ABBYY FineReader 9.0 Page-progression lr Pages 584 Possible copyright status In copyright. Digitized with the permission of the rights holder. Ppi 350 Scandate 20150603133744 Scanner scribe2.nj.archive.org Scanningcenter nj Year 1987-1992

Gal Sal and his Slaves

The record in question is a tablet, from the ancient city of Shurrupak, now modern Jemdet Nasr in Iraq. It is commonly dated to around 3100 BC and is believed to be a generation or two younger than the Kushim tablet. But its naming evidence is much more unambiguous.

The tablet begins &ldquoTwo slaves held by Gal-sal&rdquo and is then followed by the names of the aforementioned slaves: &ldquoEn-pap X and Sukkalgir&rdquo.

We do not know the context. But the fact that here are three named individuals: not important, just a citizen of Shurrupak and his slaves does make the Jemdet Nasr tablet look to be a contender for holding the earliest known name of individuals in history.

But despite writing originating in Mesopotamia, it appears that Egypt could, in fact, trump these examples from the cradle of civilization.


Watch the video: eighth wonder vriska serket mv


Comments:

  1. Rashid

    Well done, what words necessary ..., the remarkable idea

  2. Laird

    Unable to write: disc is full (R) over, (F) format, (Z) won # 911?

  3. Shaktilar

    Sorry, the topic mix. Removed

  4. Ainsworth

    You are absolutely right. In this something is I seem this good thinking. I agree with you.

  5. Daly

    The theme of the steering wheel, Shakespeare probably .......



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